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IBM model M (silver label) 1986 - 1989
IBM model M 1391401 (white label) 1987 - 1992
IBM model M 1393464 (white label) 1987 - 1992
IBM model M 1391401 (blue label) 1992 - 1996
IBM model M (blue label) 1993 - 1996
IBM model M 42H1292 (blue label) 1995 - 1999
IBM model M (51G8572) 1993 - 1997
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keyboards (new: never been used)
Rare IBM model M keyboards
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IBM model M (industrial ps/2 model)
IBM model M (soft touch buckling spring)
IBM model M space saving (84-key)
IBM model M2 (1395300 ps/1 model)
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IBM model M4-1 (trackpoint)
IBM model M5-1 (trackball)
IBM model M5-2 (trackball)
IBM model M13 black (Trackpoint II)
IBM model M13 white (Trackpoint II)
IBM model M15 (split ergonomic)
other model M keyboards (Lexmark, Dell)
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IBM PC XT original keyboard (83-key)
IBM PC AT original keyboard (84-key) 1984 - 1985
IBM model M international keyboard layouts
IBM non-clicky (rubber dome) keyboards
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ps2 keyboard to USB adapter converters
model M small parts (springs, feet, screws, keys)
replacement model M SDL to ps/2 keyboard cables
IBM trackpoint / Thinkpad pointer stick red cap
IBM model M replacement key caps
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Japanese keyboards

 model M archive project  

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Participate in the model M keyboard archive project.

Did you know that every model M keyboard has a unique serial number and production date stamped on the back of each individual keyboard?

We have always been interested in the ruggedness and extreme durability of the IBM model M keyboard since they were introduced at the very beginning of the personal computer revolution in the 1980s.  Now 20-25 years later, many of these original model M keyboards are still in use and have become vintage (but still quite useful) artifacts of an earlier computing age.  (Contrast this with some brand new keyboards that become unusable after 2 or 3 years due to cheap plastics and cost-cutting, manufacturing "shortcuts")  How many other electronic devices from the 1980's do you own and how many are still in good working order?

In the early days, computers and PC hardware were constructed as business-class professional-grade machines and instruments for specialists.  It used to be that keyboard manufacturers printed the individual date of production and were proud to show that items were "Made in USA". 

In 2010, computers and keyboards have become more simplified, commodity items to be built with the lowest-cost and lightest-weight parts.  Today, keyboards appear to be less planned and architected by product engineers for actual users with real human hands and fingers.. but are now "designed" by sales and marketing departments as "fashionable" items with ultra-lightweight construction, mood-enhancing LED lights, glossy shiny-shiny plastics, super black stealthy mode, bulbous shapes, knobs and extraneous buttons, and ExTrEm HaX0R model names.  Everyone can go to the local store or go online and buy a $7 keyboard that was mass produced with just enough parts, with perhaps a generic sticker printed yesterday that says that it was built "just in time". 

When did we forget that the primary function of a keyboard is not a fashion-accessory for the office desk-- but a tool to transform thoughts and mechanical effort into electrical data signals for a computer.

For the very few that still appreciate the tactile feel of a typewriter-based computer keyboard and can still appreciate the simplicity of black letters on white keys, one can still seek out and own an original IBM model M keyboard -- a little piece of early computing history. 

There is the expectation for the master craftsman to invest in quality precision tools and instruments to transform work and raw materials into finely crafted goods.  We believe that the modern, computer professional should have similar quality keyboards to turn his or her thoughts into computer code.

At first, we thought we were among the very few who appreciated the tactile feel and sound of a well-designed mechanical keyboard.  Since we have been selling these keyboards online since 1999, we have always wondered about the following questions....

  • When was the exact date that the first model M keyboard was first produced?
  • Who owns the oldest functional model M keyboard?
  • Can anyone do analysis of the range of serial numbers to determine the total number of model M keyboards produced?
  • How many original IBM model M keyboards still exist?
  • How many other model M fanatics are there?
  • How many dumb, eBay idiots find a keyboard in the attic and then pretend to be online keyboard experts and know how to scam, but then do not know how to read..  For example, they look at back of the IBM model M keyboard and see the info on Part No 1391401, ID No  8946869, Date 10-FEB-95, and Plt No. F1. but then mistakenly report that the keyboard is from 1984, 'cause it, like, uh, duh.. says (c) IBM Corp. 1984

As part of our ongoing efforts to collect and catalog information about model M keyboards, we have setup the following online database to assist in keeping track of model M keyboards that are still in-use today.  Much of the information in the databases below is the result of compiled information from our own previous sales over the past several years. 

Other model M keyboard fanatics are welcome to add to the database and contribute their date-specific and serial number info to the following Google Docs spreadsheet. 

Data will be reviewed and collated on a regular basis.  Please report any problems or questions to sales@clickykeyboards.com

 


Database of 1391401 keyboards (1987 - 1996)

 


 

Database of 1390120 keyboards (1986 - 89)

 

 


 

 

Database of 1390131 keyboards (1986 - 96)


 

Database of other blue label model M keyboards (1993 - 1999)


 

Database of space saving (84-key) model M keyboards

Database of black M13 (13H6705) model M keyboards

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